What the 2021 Summer Interns Have Learned – Part 2

Written by Audrey Tuttle

Last week, our blog featured an exciting post showing off this year’s summer interns. This week, we wanted to write an equally exciting post continuing the Q&A with these special individuals. Dunlap Marketing is determined to prepare these aspiring businesspeople with everything they will need to know prior to entering the business world.

Without further ado, here is part two!

What is your favorite thing about working at Dunlap Marketing?

“I really enjoy our weekly breakout sessions. I feel like I have learned a lot this summer through that time with Kaitlin. She has taught us many valuable lessons that we can start applying to our lives now, but that will be especially important post-college graduation.” – Amy Djuvik, Texas A&M University, Supply Chain Management

“My favorite thing about working at Dunlap has been collaborating and working with other interns. It is nice to have people my age in a professional setting!” – Scott Ashmore, Texas A&M University, Finance Major

How has your experience been working with the leadership team at Dunlap Marketing?

“Working with Kaitlin and Mike has been such an amazing experience. They encourage you to ask for help when needed which allowed me to perform my job duties to the best of my ability. They have created a warm and welcoming work environment that generates the desire to come into the office each and every day and truly enjoy the work that I do.” – Molly Rhoden, University of Oklahoma, Business Management Major

Is there anything that you have learned here that will be beneficial in your future within the business world? If so, what is it?

“The detail that goes into a lot of things can show people that you care and that they are valued, so I think that is something that can really help me in the future if I remember to always pay attention to details.” – Daniel Corteguera, Southwestern University, Business Major and Spanish Minor

“I think learning to be comfortable with cold calls has been very beneficial because no matter what you do you will have to talk to people and being able to make a good first impression quickly will help in all areas of life; business and social.”- Amy Djuvik, Texas A&M University, Supply Chain Management

We have had an incredible summer watching these interns grow within many areas of our company, and we are excited to see the impact that they each will make on the business world.

What the 2021 Summer Interns Have Learned

Written by Audrey Tuttle

Dunlap Marketing has a heart for helping the current generation of college students with their desire to get real-world experience – we’re proud to have hosted over 20 interns over the past six years (check out some of our previous interns here, here, and here)! Our summer internship program has created an opportunity for these ambitious individuals to work firsthand with the leadership team and staff at Dunlap Marketing. Each year we have been blown away from the talent and hard work that has been shown by our interns, and this year is no exception. With a group of six students who come from a variety of different colleges, they have been able to grow their knowledge outside of the classroom and work on various projects within our company.

They have gained experience in cold calling, lead generation, telemarketing, marketing through social media, data research, B2B operations, and much more. Additionally, the interns have learned about the ins and outs of being successful in the workforce through the weekly breakout sessions with Mike Dunlap and Kaitlin Dunlap Cuevas.

Of course, these statements can only be backed with a fun Q&A with the interns…

What work have you been doing at Dunlap Marketing?

“I have been working on research projects where we have been gathering information via telephone as well as online research. I recently started a project where we are surveying current customers to see the future of their fleet’s regarding electric vehicles!” – Scott Ashmore, Texas A&M University, Finance Major

“Over the course of my internship at Dunlap Marketing, I have been working on several B2B campaigns. Typically, this includes calling other businesses, obtaining general information, setting appointments and performing surveys.” –  Molly Rhoden, University of Oklahoma, Business Management.

What skills have you developed while working at Dunlap?

“While setting appointments, closing can be a tough task, and I feel as if my ability to read the customer and communicate clearly and efficiently has grown immensely.” – Thomas Nassab, Clemson University, Financial Management

“I would say the biggest skill I have developed is confidence when talking to people. I’m not always the most outgoing person so getting more comfortable talking to other people in a professional environment has definitely improved my communication skills.”- Daniel Corteguera, Southwestern University, Majoring in Business and Minoring in Spanish

We love hearing what our interns have to say about their experience at Dunlap Marketing. Check out next week’s blog for part two of our intern Q&A. You won’t want to miss it!

How To Identify Your Target Market With Three Simple Data Points

Part 2

As B2B marketers, business developers, and salespeople, it’s our responsibility to keep the sales pipeline full of prospects. This is no easy feat and takes a lot of hard work. When the flow of word-of-mouth leads and referrals runs dry, where do you go? How do you define your target market and find businesses that can become your future prospects?

Last week, we discussed the two ways to approach this question – the method that will be the best fit for your company depends on your starting point.

  • Starting Point #1: You have a list of current and/or past customers AND you want to continue selling to customers who are similar.
  • Starting Point #2: You are starting from scratch. This means, you do not have a list of current and/or past customers OR you have a list, but you do not want to reach this group, instead, you want to target a new segment.

If Starting Point #1 sounds like a fit for you, go back and read this post.

Maybe you’re just starting out. Or maybe your goal is to grow by breaking into a new segment. If so, Option 2 is for you. Arguably, this route can feel very intimidating. But, if you apply the same three data points we reviewed last week, geography, industry, and size, you can easily conquer identifying your target market.

Here’s how to use geography, industry, and size when you’re starting from scratch.

  1. Geography – can be defined by state, city, county, zip code, or even neighborhood
    • When you’re starting with a clean slate, it is easy to think “everyone is my prospect”. And while that might be the case, it is not an attainable lead generation tactic. You need to have a starting point, or an “A List”. If you put your blinders on and start thinking realistically, geographically, where will your first buyers come from? Often, they come from your own backyard – or neighborhood, county, city, state, etc.
  2. Industry
    • Start by filtering out industries you know you do not want to work inside of – examples include competitors and non-fits. For example, if you’re a business banker, you would want to filter out other banks.
    • Next, brainstorm the industries that are good-fits. This is where you’ll start finding your target industries. For example, if you sell industrial kitchen equipment, you will want to include industries such as restaurants, hotels, senior living facilities, hospitals, etc.
  3. Size – can be defined by employee count, revenue ranges, or physical square-footage
    • This is where you begin zeroing in and really start identifying your target market. There are multiple ways to define the size of a company – depending on your product or service, we suggest using either employee count, annualized revenue, or square-footage – sometimes, a combination of the three. For example, if you sell on-site fueling services, there’s probably a minimum number of gallons you want to fill on each site – you can use employee count to gauge the number of cars on site, which will give you an approximate number of gallons. Or, if you’re a commercial roofer, you would look at square-footage to determine buildings that have roofs that are in the size-range you want to do business with.

Whether you’re starting from scratch or have hundreds of existing customers, you can identify your target market. By using geography, industry, and size, you will be well on your way to your next selling opportunity!

How To Identify Your Target Market With Three Simple Data Points

Part 1

Wouldn’t it be great if word-of-mouth and referrals were the only leads our businesses ever needed to survive?! Unfortunately, we know that in the business-to-business world, it’s just not feasible for a business to survive only on inbound inquires. As B2B marketers, business developers, and salespeople, we must put in a fair amount of elbow-grease to generate a flow of interest; in other words, it takes a lot of time and effort to ensure our pipelines stay full.

The responsibility of keeping a pipeline full of prospects is no easy feat. There is a world filled with companies that could be your future buyers. Where do you start? How do you identify the businesses that are your target market?

There are two ways to approach this question – the method that will be the best fit for your company depends on your starting point.

  • Starting Point #1: You have a list of current and/or past customers AND you want to continue selling to customers who are similar.
  • Starting Point #2: You are starting from scratch. This means, you do not have a list of current and/or past customers OR you have a list, but you do not want to reach this group, instead, you want to target a new segment.

If you are beginning at Starting Point #1, to identify the businesses that are your target market, you will do an exercise called “mirroring”. In databasing, mirroring is when you use a current database to create a brand-new database with records that have similar qualities – like you’re creating a “mirror image” of the current database.

Essentially, mirroring a database is taking an existing database and making a second that has the same (or very similar) criteria, to include additional records. This is a great way to grow in the same vertical. To create the highest quality mirrored list possible, you need to define three critical data points – geography, industry, and company size.

  1. Geography – can be defined by state, city, county, or zip code
    • Where are these customers located? Is their location a relevant part of their buying process?  
  2. Industry
    • Are there similar industries that your customers fall into? Maybe you have a large portion of customers who are in the manufacturing industry. Look for trends and take note of them.
  3. Size – can be defined by employee count, revenue ranges, or physical square-footage
    • Again, trends are important to note here. Think outside of the box when it comes to the size of your customers. They might vary in the number of employees they have, but maybe their annualized revenues fall into similar ranges.

After you have gathered intel from these three data points, you will have the information needed to create your mirrored list. If you have experience building databases, rock’n’roll! If not, find a trustworthy provider, such as Dunlap Marketing, that can build the database for you. When your database is built, we always suggest going back to scrub it for duplicate records, current clients, etc. Once scrubbing is finished, you will be left with a brand-new list of prospects that fall in your target marketing.

If you want to identify your target market, but you don’t have a current database to use for mirroring, Starting Point #2 is where you’ll begin. Check back next week for a guide on how to identify your target market from scratch.